Robbie’s Daily Poems

From The Archives: The Worst Bag Ever

I had a nasty habit—so teacher always said—
Of losing notes and books and hats and snacks.
She’d pass us out permission forms when it was half past three,
And tell us, “Put them straight into your packs.”

But by the time my Mum and Dad were asking ‘bout my day,
My notes and books were nearly always gone,
The next day, I’d ask sheepishly to have the note again,
My teacher would just stare at me in scorn.

“Why Billy Jones, you’ll lose your very head, one day,” she’d say.
I simply nodded, staring at my shoes.
I felt so bad. I tried so hard, but things just disappeared!
The missing things brought on a case of blues.

Then one day, Thomas Mitchell handed me an envelope.
“An invite to my party!” he said, glad.
I placed it, oh so carefully, inside my backpack then,
‘Cos if I lost it, that would make me sad.

Lo and behold, just thirty minutes later, at my house,
I could not find the invite. Not at all!
I rummaged, looked and fossicked, leaning deep into my bag,
And soon I felt myself begin to fall.

The world went dark. It all went quiet. I landed with a Plonk!
I opened up my eyes. And all around,
Were notes and books and crackers, old bananas and a shoe,
In piles and piles and piles upon the ground.

the-worst-bag-ever.jpg

“My goodness!” I exclaimed. “Where am I? What are all these things?”
“Oh Billy,” said a voice, “I’m glad you’re here.
You see, your backpack’s magic, so that’s why your notes and snacks
And toys and old bananas disappear.”

“What do I do?” I asked the voice. “I hate when all my stuff
Goes missing. And my parents hate it too!”
“That’s easy,” said the voice. “Your backpack’s magic—that is clear.
So all you need’s another one. Brand new.”

So shortly after, I got all my pocket money out.
I bought a brand new bag for school and sports.
My magic backpack never held another note or book.
From now on? It was just for bad reports.

Original Illustration © Robbie Yates 2017

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From The Archives: Super Eraser

One boring Christmas morning, I opened up my gift.
With just one present left under the tree,
I once again grew solemn, and sad that we were poor.
Why were there never lovely gifts for me?

My gift was just a ruler, two pencils and two pens,
A small eraser and a pencil case.
My mom, who worked long hours, just wrapped me in her arms,
When she saw disappointment on my face.

“I’m sorry, Spud, I’m sorry. I wish we could have more,
But things have been a little tight this year.”
She held my arms so gently, a twinkle in her eye,
Then leaned back in and whispered in my ear:

“I think that the eraser, while looking fairly plain,
Is quite a bit more special than you think.
I won it in a raffle. It’s cutting-edge and smart.
It rubs out more than pencil lines and ink.”

super-eraser.jpg
I tested what Mum said then. I went in to my room.
It rubbed out pencil, pen, and even more.
I wandered over, pensive, and crouched down very low,
It rubbed the very carpet off the floor!

I moved up to the window. Outside there was some trash.
Some broken chairs and boxes—a whole load.
I rubbed it on the glass then, my eyes were opened wide.
Now no more junk was piled up on the road!

The next hour was a whirlwind of laughs and smiles and fun
As I found all the things I could erase.
The rubbish—gone! The dishes, the weeds all disappeared!
I cleared them all in an eraser craze!

I pondered and I planned, then. I found a secret place
To keep my new eraser safe and sound.
I didn’t want to waste it. I’d use it wisely now.
I’d save it for Mom’s stressed-out worried frown.

I’d keep it for my sister, for when she scraped her knees,
Or when she felt upset or sick or sad.
I sidled up to Mum, then, and hugged her tight and warm.
“Mom, thanks. This is the best thing that I’ve had.”

Image © Robbie Yates 2017

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Friday Flash Fiction: Morons

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“Excuse me—”

I reeled around. “For the last time,” I said, “I don’t work here! Just because I’m wearing a tie… when will you people realize?!”

“I—um—”

I shook my head. “I’ve just hadit with you morons! No, I don’t know where the masking tape is. Or the staplers. Or the ink. I swear, if one more dimwit asks me about acrylic paint…”

“No, sir, I’m sorry—it’s just—you dropped your wallet.”

(75 Words)

Image from Pixabay © Ashish_Choudhary 2014

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Bath Time (A Nonet Poem)

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no, don’t make me get in the bath, mom!
I’ll get soap in my eyes again!
I’ll have two baths tomorrow—
wait—okay; there’s bubbles
yellow rubber ducks
bobbing freely
oops. plug pulled.
shallow
dry

(A Nonet Poem is a poem that begins with 9 syllables in the first line, 8 in the second… and finishing with one syllable in the ninth and final line).

Image from Pixabay © skdickerson 2016

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